P: Predators

The book Predators, by Gregory Cooper and Michael King, was fabulous in understanding the mind of the attacker. You may wonder why this is important, but understanding the predator helps you to protect yourself better. Like my friend who tried to help the man on the corner, if you know people will use your heart to take advantage of you then you will be more careful when you try to help someone.

In The Gift of Fear, Gavin DeBecker also addresses several clues to watch for which he calls “survival signals.” From “forced teaming” to “discounting the word no” he gives examples of how a criminal will use the technique, help you see it as a signal for yourself, and give you techniques to confront or fight in order to keep you safe.

The fact of the matter is we expect criminals to look like bad people. We want them to be dirty, grungy, look evil, and have an aura that exposes them before they ever get close. We want them to stay in certain areas of the city so we can avoid them, and so that we can be safe. But none of this is true. Mr. DeBecker said that only 20% of homicides are committed by strangers, and too often the people who commit crimes look and act just like us, but they don’t think like we do. This is why it is important to understand the mind of a predator, in order to defend yourself in the best possible way.

Comments

  1. Both my son and my daughter work with convicted criminals in different institutional settings.

    My son specifically works with some of the worst (convicted of violent crimes.) It's actually very scary but the fact is that many of them look and act like regular people.

    Fortunately they're not free to walk in society any longer. Unfortunately someone has already paid the price for that fact with their life or limb..

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    1. Oh goodness. He could teach so much, I'm sure.

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  2. Difficult statistics to swallow! But a good reality check!

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  3. Yep, I ended up being totally scammed once. I felt like a total idiot afterwards.

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    Replies
    1. Oh don't!!! It was THEM that behaved badly. You simply trusted. There is NOTHING wrong with that.

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